Sensorium Tests

2012

About

Within a scientific facility, subjective perceptions take center stage. A woman is being measured in a controlled laboratory environment for her capacity to respond to sensory stimuli while two researchers, hidden behind a one way mirror, look on. The subject’s responses to selected objects (a speaker, a fan, a lamp, and finally, a person) mimic the real-life neurological phenomenon of synaesthesia, the inextricable joining of normally separate perceptions (‘hearing’ colors, ‘smelling’ words, ‘tasting’ shapes, ‘feeling’ names). In particular, our protagonist is tested for a form of synaesthesia in which visually observed touch –to objects or to people- is felt viscerally on her own body. As the experiment progresses, the synaesthete begins to sense a presence behind the one-way mirror, imaginatively bridging the alienating strangeness of the situation. Sensorium Tests questions how sensations might be created and shared between people and objects.

Cast Onscreen

Anamaria Marinca
Valeria Napoleone
Mark Barker
Flo Brooks
Susanne Bürner
James Wannerton

Cast Voiceovers

Daniella Dessa
Michael Dixon
Dan Mersh

Crew

Director of Photography
Suzie Lavelle

Editor
Guy Ducker

Sound Editor
Franziska Treutler

Composer
Zeena Parkins

Production
Pundersons Gardens

Line Producer
Marcus Werner Hed

Production Manager
Bibi Lacroix

1st Assistant Director
Peter Lee Scott

Additional Cinematography
Jaime Feuil-Torres

First Assistant Camera
Pete Lowden

Second Assistant Camera
Joe Martin

Grip
Pablo Rojo

Gaffer
Matt Dowler

Spark
Chris Brennan

Sound Recordist
Jerome McCann

Set Designer
Alex Breeden

Props Buyer
Robert Sinnott

Props Assistant
Sharon Clancey

Art Department Assistants
Stephanie Williams
William Breeden

Make-up Artist
Bunny Hazel Clarke

Runner
Ellie Gray

Continuity
Cosimo Lipparini

Lab Scheduler
Steven Mitchell

Grading
Mato Der Avanesian

Stills Photographer
Thierry Bal

Post-production Supervisor
Jesse Watt

Percussion
William Winant performing on the
Lou Harrison Gamelan

Thanks to

Martin Crimp
Michael Banissy
Jamie Ward
Simon Baron-Cohen
Walt Rose
Steven Mitchell
Sean Day
Those synasthetes whose accounts are heard as voice-overs in the film: Barbara Gould
Omar Gould
Ramona Fernandez
Jean Benitz
Catherine Young

Funded by

The Wellcome Trust
Arts Council England

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One of the things that makes me doubt

2010–2011

About

One of The Things… illuminates a web of images suspended between Martin’s own body of film work and her late grandmother’s dream diaries. Entries from the diaries – read out by performers featured in her previous films – are matched with outtakes from these ten years’ worth of films.

One of the Things… complicates the confessional style of the ‘video-diary’ by slowly shifting the focus from Martin’s grandmother to the actors as a central focus, and through subtle dissonances between their readings of the diaries, their desultory comments on them and their voiceless presence in Martin’s past films.

Started as an outwards journey of parallel discovery of her grandmothers’ dream-memories – recorded over thirty years of Jungian analysis – and of Martin’s own cinematic histories, the film slowly acquires a dream-like circularity in which archive and imagination blur and the initial synchronicity between films and diaries is disrupted by gaps, divergences and repetitions. The film is a fantastical and spiraling reflection on the performativity of dreaming, and on cinema as an impossible act of witnessing.

Cast

Nina Fog
Karin Gulbran
Anna Halprin
Christiane Ostertag
Zeena Parkins
Elana Scherr
Scarlet Sparkuhl Delia
Rita Tushingham

Crew

Director of Photography
Zillah Bowes

Editor
Guy Ducker

Sound Editor
Quentin Chiapetta

Composer
Zeena Parkins

Production
Pundersons Gardens

Line Producer
Marcus Werner Hed

London Crew

1st Assistant Camera
Philippe Cointepas

2nd Assistant Camera
Paul Dain

Gaffer
Brian Beaumont

Grip
Emmet Cahill

Spark
Gary Nagle

Sound Recordist
Jerome McCann

Art Department
Jeannine Inglis Hall
Gary Ambell

Stills Photographer
Thierry Bal

Makeup
Anna Englis Hall

Assistants
Jesse Watt
Ed Webb Ingall
Dana Vronska

Driver
Noah Sherwood

Los Angeles Crew

Line Producer
Vanessa Black

Production Manager
Michelle Newman

1st Assistant Director
Jon Michael Kondrath

Director of Photography
Sean Stiegemeire

Gaffer
Jamie Urman

Sound Recordist
Jeff Pace

Sets
Greg Lang
Matt Galupo

Makeup
Heather Reinhart

Assistant
Alison O’Daniel

Funded by

The Leverhulme Trust

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Minotaur

2008

About

Octogenarian choreographer Anna Halprin, pioneer of postmodern dance, recently created an erotic performance based on Auguste Rodin’s rendering of the Greek legend. Minotaur traces labyrinthine transformations, in which photographs, sculpture and dance succeed and replace one another, and in which bodies and objects appear part of a continuous tissue.

Fluctuations between disparate media are accompanied by shifts in gender dynamics; in Rodin’s original the half-man / half-bull grips an ambivalent nymph, while in Halprin’s iteration the female ‘victim’ turns the story on its head, wresting a melancholic triumph over her captor. A score by Matmos, which includes the sounds of Rodin sculptures being struck like instruments, echoes the sculpture’s muscularity.

Cast

Joy Cosculluela
Anna Halprin
G Hoffman Soto

Crew

Choreographer
Anna Halprin

Composers
Matmos

Director of Photography
Jon Else

Editor
Guy Ducker

Line Producer
Tom Dingle

Production Manager
Shylah Hamilton

Production Services
Complex Corporation

Additonal Photography
Michael Chin

First Camera Assistants
John Gazdik
Paul Marbury

Gaffers
Peter Thomas
Dave Cherry

Sound Recordists
Colin Blackshear
Nick Rupiper

Sound Editor
Quentin Chiapetta

Additional Music
Lisle Ellis

Stills Photographer
Sean Donnelly

Costume Designer
Emily Hagen

Production Assistants
Donna Chung
Jennifer Connelly
Melissa Howden
Job Piston
Chadwick Rantanen
Merav Tzur

Thanks to

Bernard Barryte
Cantor Arts Center
Stephanie Earle
Rop Epstein
David Martin
Dominic Molon
Mountain Home Studio
Len Thornton

Commissioned by

The 3M Consortium Project
(Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, New Museum, New York, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)

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Harpstrings and Lava

2007

About

An alchemist and a feral child pull along a tight line bridging control and chaos. The characters teeter between extreme states, embodied by stylised performances and by constructed stage sets: a symmetrical arcade contrasts with a cave full of junk. Fake and real vines snake between the split geography, and a ‘Frankenstein’-like story unfolds along these paths.

Harpstrings and Lava seeks to channel the tension inherent in certain nightmares, specifically in one friend’s ghoulish fantasy about clashing contradictions. In this particular recurrent dream, tensile harpstrings and viscous lava inhabited the same space simultaneously, creating a sensation of visceral dread. Harpstrings and Lava aims to gently animate such ‘hyper-real’ dream images, drawing the viewer closer to the feeling of inexorable, anxious attachment shared by the onscreen characters.

Cast

Nina Fog
Zeena Parkins

Crew

Composer and Sound Designer
Zeena Parkins

Director of Photography
Nina Kellgren

Editor
Guy Ducker

Line Producer
Tom Dingle

Production Manager
Ioanna Karavela

First Camera Assistant
Mike Green

Second Camera Assistant
John Hurley

Camera 2 Operator
Neus Olle

Camera 2 Assistant
Alison Lai

Gaffer
Ewan Cassidy

Sparks
Suzie Willett
Annika Sommerson

Sound Recordist
Mike Hasler

Sound Mixer
Quentin Chiappetta

Additional Music
Ikue Mori
Shelley Hirsch

Still Photographer
Thierry Bal

Makeup Artist
Caroline Weston

Art Department Assistants
Karolina Raczynska
Erica Cheung
Taka Goto
Jacob Wolff
Charlotte Crowther
Daniel Yeo
Amanda Simon

Thanks to

Nina Folkersma
RoseLee Goldberg
Candida Gertler
Maureen Paley
Phillipe Van Cauteren
Esa Nickle
Len Thornton
Sweet Love Café
Wallis Gallery
Watermill Center

Commissioned by

Outset, London
Performa, New York
SMAK, Ghent

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Wintergarden

2005

About

The starting point of Wintergarden, like that of In the Palace, was Martin’s fascination with a piece of sculpture – in this case, an unrealised monumental statue of Persephone, Greek goddess of the underworld. This statue was meant to tower over the De La Warr Pavilion, a modernist masterpiece on England’s south coast, romantic embodiment of ‘socialism by the sea’, and the primary location for this film. It was the Pavilion’s architect, Eric Mendelsohn, who, in the 1930’s, proposed, and then abandoned, plans for Persephone to grace his 20th century ‘wintergarden’, although she seemed a peculiar choice to embody the upbeat, health conscious, quasi-sanitorium character of his building. Perhaps Mendelsohn, a Jew exiled from Weimar Berlin, chose this split, dark goddess because she mirrored his own state of exile.

Wintergarden revivifies this lost project, using the structure of the Pavilion as armature, and for flesh: a young woman’s climb, downwards, into a strange world of song. Alternating between dark and light, between upward lifting and downward spiraling, Wintergarden awakens a dynamic tension between opposites. The film moves beyond historical reference to the period between the world wars by pointing towards, more generally, captive emotions that shadow heroism.

Cast

Nina Fog
Jenny Tarren
Maja Ratkje
Sophie Arstall
Minami Tamagawa
Katy Wood
Lucy Card
Zoe Duano
Rachel Healey
Lucy Hemmings
Jessica Highfield
Lauren Hutchinson
Tori Morgan Jones
Emily Kempson
Emma Matthews
Gemma Maynard
Jenny Poll
Anne Marie Stretton

Crew

Choreographer
Henrietta Hale

Composer
Maja Ratkje

Costume Designer
Hamish Morrow

Director of Photography
Noski Deville

Editor
Ülrike Munch

Sound Designer
Franco Adams

Head of Production
Bevis Bowden

Production Coordinator
Nina Ernst

First Assistant Director
Ioanna Karavela

Second Assistant Director
Karenjit Sahota

First Camera Assistant
David Wyatt

Second Camera Assistant
Pete Emery

Third Camera Assistant
Roland Grafenstein

Gaffer
Tom Guy

Best Boy
Shaun Mone

Sparks
Paul Brennan
Andrew Green

Rigging
Location Extreme

Grip
Alex Coverly

Sound Recordist
Franco Adams

Still Photographer
Peter Fauland

Makeup Artist
Caroline Weston

Costumes Assistants
Oden Wilson
Jemma Corbett

Production Assistant
Anna Vass

Runners
Rory Heffernan
Holly Heffernan
Elias Saunders-Deutsch

Thanks to

Peter Caw
Celia Davies
Jennifer Ginbey
Len Thornton
Tony Williams

Commissioned by

De La Warr Pavilion
Film and Video Umbrella

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Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon

2004–2005

About

This work takes as its impetus the discipline of the Modern Pentathlon, an anachronistic Olympic sport comprised of running, swimming, shooting, horseback riding, and fencing. Its five formalized events were chosen by Baron de Coubertin, founder of the Modern Olympics, to encapsulate the fictional adventures of a gentleman liaison officer who fights his way on horseback, foot, and finally through water, to deliver an urgent message.

Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon archly hangs this rarified sporting discipline on the narrative structure of the British Angry Young Man film The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962). This newly imagined version is also set in an isolated school in rural England and likewise plumbs themes of individualism versus collectivity. Yet, crucially, elements have changed.

In Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon, a charismatic, ageing headmistress (rather than headmaster), played by Rita Tushingham, iconic star of British New Wave cinema, presides over the daily life of her charges. Her regard – sometimes tender, sometimes cool – is echoed by the camera’s voyeuristic observations that accumulate in a series loose narrative vignettes. Played by both professional dancers and Olympic-level Pentathletes, this group of youths enact a fictitious form of the Modern Pentathlon through hybrid movements that are part dance, part sport, part experimental performance.

Cast

Rita Tushingham
Sam Weale
Lorena Randi
Emily Bright
Dylan Elmore
Fred Gherig
Neil Gibson
Henrietta Hale
Sian Lewis
Rachel Lopez
David Minchin
Jonathan Stephens
Lindsey Weedon

Crew

Choreographer
Henrietta Hale

Composer
Zeena Parkins

Director of Photography
Noski Deville

Editor
Ülrike Munch

Sound Designer
Charis Coke

Production Executives
Maggie Ellis
Franco Marinotti

Production Manager
Pinky Ghundale

Production Coordinator
Ionna Karavela

First Camera Assistant
Steve Annis

Camera Loaders Anna
James Karen Jit

Gaffer
Tom Guy

Sparks
Suzie Lavelle
Shaun Mone

Grips
Duncan Barrett
Lawrence Beckwith

Sound Assistant
Andy Hayward

Sound Editing Assistant
Melissa Mohamdee

Still Photographers
Thierry Bal Ryu Voelkel

Makeup Artist
Jo Stelly

Headmistress’s Jacket
Natalie Jones

Costume and Prop
Master Jennifer Clark

Costume and Prop Assistant
Sam Tidman

Runner
Anna Vass

Title Design
Paul Hetherington

Music supervised by
Electra Productions

Music performed by
Zeena Parkins
The Kitchen House Blend Orchestra, NYC

Thanks to

Triona Adams
Adidas
Arri Media
Jan Bartu
Jo Beadsworth
Lali Chetwynd
Edit Hire
Darren Flook
Fuji Film
Handweavers Studio
Hempstead Equestrian Centre
David Kean
Leon Paul Fencing
Lewis Lyons Executive Cars
Charlotte Mailler
National Rifle Association
National Small Bourne Rifle Association
Istvan Nemeth
Bruno Pacheco
Alan Pett
Peter, Halina and Jim Scharf
Seedpower Studio
Len Thornton
United Nude

Funded by

The Arts Council England with support of Film London and by Fine Arts Unternehmen

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Soft Materials

2004

About

Soft Materials was shot in the Artificial Intelligence Lab at the University of Zurich where scientists research ‘embodied artificial intelligence’. This cutting edge area of AI produces robots which, rather than being programmed from the ‘head down’ by a computer ‘brain’, instead learn to function through the experience of their physical bodies.

Soft Materials introduces to these robots two performers, one man and one woman, trained in body awareness, acutely sensitive to the nuances of movement, primed to mimic the robots in a play of reciprocity. These performers shed skins of soft fabric, bear their joints like the frank structure of a machine, and, nude, approach the robots as if they were sentient beings. Creating intimate relationships that are in turns tender, funny and eerie, they bend flexible human fantasy around tough materials.

Cast

Ben Ash
Nina Fog

Eyebot
A-mouse
ADAPT Hand
Dumbo
Stumpy
Blimp Bot

Crew

Director of Photography
Noski Deville

Editor
Ülrike Munch

First Camera Assistant
Ioanna Karavela

Gaffer
Peter Emery

Sound Recordist
Daniel Hobi

Sound Mixer
Clare Manning

Stills Photographer
Peter Fauland

Production Assistant
Pascal Merz

Thanks to

Researchers at the University of Zurich AI Lab:
Lukas Lichtensteiger
Gabriel Gomez
Fumiya Ida
Simon Bovet
Daniel Bisig
and the Director of the lab,
Dr. Rolf Pfeifer
Len Thorton at Soho Images

Commissioned by

The Showroom, London

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Closeup Gallery

2003

About

A sleight of hand artist and an actress play a strange game at a table with layers like transparent wheels, communicating in a secret code, both hiding and revealing meaning. Colored playing cards are shuffled, spread, stacked, arranged, thrown, and mysteriously substituted, to a yearning soundtrack of voice and electronics.

Closeup Gallery completes the trilogy of short films that began with In the Palace (2000) and Birds (2001). The small communities of those earlier films are replaced here by an intimate communion of two; the earlier elaborate mise en scene are distilled into the microcosm of a card-covered table; the conceit of ‘hand made magic’ that travels through the trilogy is here literalized through the card players’ world of fakery, where simple materials transform.

Within a ‘backstage’ space that seems to bind opposites, clumsy fumbling and suave expertise relate; a flow of learning appears to pass from the man to the woman, but his fingers too falter, and the control is sometimes all hers. Following the two performers’ tentative exchange of glances, spray painted cards dance free from their manipulations, as if dramatizing inner worlds in motion.

Cast

Bill Goodwin
Necar Mohsenzadegan

Crew

Music Composed and Performed by
Egill Sæbjörnsson

Director of Photography
Patrick Keating

First Assistant Director
Ashley Teplin

First Camera Assistant
Jarrod Heath

Key Grip
David Cruz

Grips
Jeff Pins
Todd Winniecki

Stills Photographer
Michael Queenland

Thanks to

Gordon Bean
Frank Papp
Angel Chen

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Birds

2001

About

Preening within the white space of a photographer’s studio, the performers in Birds form still tableaux that leave them open to the viewer’s visual appetite. Lights move; shadows float across faces, skin, and hand-painted surfaces. The environment that supports and surrounds the performers is set in motion as well, turning and swaying without reference to solid ground.

Birds is a kind of magic act that shows how the trick is done. The film mines pre-digital tools, using archaic film tricks, the contrived staginess of theatre, the old-fashioned pleasures of the ‘plastic arts’ and the transformative thrill of fashion to create a completely different kind of ‘virtual reality’. Fantasy is made tangible through visible seams and holes, and as a result, attention vacillates between the transformation of everyday materials, and that transformation’s failure. A soundtrack crafted on the moog synthesizer grounds the gliding world in ironic analog humility.

Cast

Tamsin Carlson
Robin Conrad
Liz Hoefner
Armin Moridian
Elena Scherr

Crew

Director of Photography
Patrick Keating

Composer
Brian Kehew

First Assistant Director
Matilde Matteucci

First Camera Assistant
Jarrod Heath

Key Grip
David Cruz

Grip
Emily Lacey

Stage Manager
Claudia Zannoni

Sets Engineer
Bob Merritt

Sets Production
Savando Guerrero
Bob Merritt
Elana Scherr

Stage Hands
Court Dickert
Rachel Osborn
Ashley Teplin

Stills Photographers
Anthony Pierson
Ramona Trent

Costume Assistants
Felisa Funes
Trevor Watson

Makeup Artists
Zee Graham
Rachel Romero

Production Services
Complex Corporation

Thanks to

Miauhaus
Alex Blatt
Andy Martin
Bob Merritt

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In the Palace

2000

About

In the Palace began with a daydream to enter inside two inaccessible places, to penetrate the tinyness of Giacometti’s surrealist sculpture The Palace at 4am (1932) and to move beyond the flatness of various photographs of early Modern stage and dance productions. In this film, Giacometti’s sculpture (which in a sense already resembles a theatrical model) is streamlined and scaled up to become a stage set proper; the posed theatrical stills are restaged as tableaux vivants.

Clothed in home-made costumes and striking stock poses, the performers in In the Palace parade degraded moments of 20th Century culture: the theatrical gestures of the Bauhaus, George Platt Lyne’s lush photographs of the American Ballet Theater, the stylized choreography of The Ballet Russe, Martha Graham’s Lamentation. In the Palace scrutinizes and releases these moments’ weird merging of hyperbolic emotional content and rigorous formalism.

In the Palace eases melodrama into a diffused melancholy; the tableaux are emptied of character and narrative, the performers’ expressions are blank, and a soundtrack of rainfall rumbles in the distance like muted applause. The film’s roving point of view and shifting shadows create the illusion that the set itself might be turning, and produces the essential emotional action of the film –its hypnotic, voyeuristic circling.

Cast

Scarlett Sparkul
Eden Lighthipe
Toby Slezak
Ann Mazzocca

Crew

Camera
Xiaoyen Wang

Grips
Karin Gulbran
Felisa Funes
Marisa Holmes
Karen Koh
Kristi Nystul
Nicolau Vergueiro
Lisa Von Blanckensee
Trevor Watson

Costume Assistants
Felisa Funes
Trevor Watson

Set Construction
Ben Evans
Torbjörn Vevji

Stills Photographer
Torbjörn Vejvi

Thanks to

Charles Ray
Dennis Cooper
Andy Martin
Camille Landau
Tiare White

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Contact

mail@dariamartin.com

Represented by

Maureen Paley
21 Herald Street
London E2 6JT
t.+44 (0) 207 729 4112
f. +44 (0) 207 729 4113
info@maureenpaley.com

Biography

Born 1973, San Francisco, USA.
Lives and works in London.

Selected Collections

Tate, London
New Museum, New York
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Museum of Contempoary Art, Chicago
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles
Arts Council England, London
Kadist Foundation, Paris
Ringier, Zurich

About

Daria Martin’s 16mm films aim to create a continuity or parity between disparate artistic media (such as painting and performance), between people and objects, and between internal and social worlds. Human gesture and seductive imagery meet physically mannered artifice to pry loose viewers’ learned habits of perception. Mistranslation opens holes for imagination to enter or exit.

Subjects such as robots, an archive of dream diaries and close-up card magic, are explored within isolated spaces such as the wings of a theatre, a military academy, or a scaled up modernist sculpture. These protective yet fragmented settings, full of seams and shadows, stand in for the capacities of the film medium itself, a permeable container that consumes and recycles the world at large.

Education

2000

M.F.A., cum laude
University of California, Los Angeles

1995

B.A., Humanities, magna cum laude
Phi Beta Kappa, Yale University

Awards & Residencies

2014

AHRC Mid-Career Fellowship, London

2012

Leverhulme Network Award
The Leverhulme Trust, London

2010

Wellcome Trust Arts Award, London

2009

Philip Leverhulme Prize The Leverhulme Trust, London

2008

Wellcome Trust Arts Award, London
Artist in residence, Headlands Center for the Arts, San Francisco

2007

Artist in residence, The Watermill Center, New York

2002

Artist in residence, Delfina Studios Trust, London

1999

Artist in Residence, Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris

Solo Exhibitions

(C) denotes that a catalogue was or will be published in conjunction with the exhibition

2014

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities
(Daria Martin and Susan Hiller) California College of the Arts, Wattis Institute, San Francisco, California (C)

2013

One of the Things That Makes Me Doubt
Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, Australia (C)

Sensorium Tests
Galeria Stadtpark, Krems, Austria (C)

2012

Sensorium Tests
Milton Keynes Gallery, Milton Keynes (C)

2011

Daria Martin with Anna Halprin
Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan

2009-2010

Three M Commission: Minotaur
Touring Exhibition
MCA Chicago, New Museum, New York, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (C)

2008

BP British Art Displays 1500-2008
Tate Britain, London

Maureen Paley, London

2007

Continuous Project Altered Monthly
Curated by Jens Hoffmann
CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco

PERFORMA07, New York

S.M.A.K., Ghent

2006

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

Wintergarden
Castlefield Gallery, Manchester

2005

Five Fights
Kunstverein in Hamburg, Hamburg (C)

Daria Martin
Kunsthalle Zürich, Zürich (C)

Man and Mask
Collective Gallery, Edinburgh

Daria Martin
Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Stuttgart

Soft Materials
The Showroom, London (C)

2004

Daria Martin: Closeup Gallery
Hotel, London

2003

Daria Martin: Art Now Lightbox
Tate Britain, London

Closeup Gallery
Analix Forever Gallery, Geneva

2001

Birds Gallery Two
Andrea Rosen Gallery New York

Two Person Exhibitions

2006

A world of pleasures to win
Daria Martin and Bernd Kraus Curated
by Melanie Ohnemus, dreizehnzwei, Vienna (C)

Choreographic Turn
Daria Martin and Peter Welz
MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge

2004

Sophie Macpherson and Daria Martin
Glasgow Sculpture Studios, Glasgow

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2015

14th Istanbul Biennial
Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Art, Istanbul (C)

2014

How the Tangible Shapes the Mind
Kunstverein Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany

10th Shanghai Biennale
Shanghai, China (C)

2013

Man-Space-Machines: The Theatre Experiments of the Bauhaus
Dessau Bauhaus Foundation, Dessau Weird Science, Jack Hanley Gallery, New York (C)

2012

Man in the Holocene
MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, USA (C)

Performance Now
Center for the Arts, Wesleyan University, Connecticut, USA

Kadist – Pathways into a Collection
Misheng Art Museum, Shanghai

2011

Animism
Generali Foundation, Vienna, (C)

Blockbuster
Curated by Jens Hoffman Masin, Museo de Arte de Sinaola, Sinaola, Mexico, touring to Macro, Museo Arte Contemporaneo, Monterrey, Mexico (C)

Move: Art and Dance since the 60s
Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany, touring to K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf, Germany (C)

2010

Animism
Extra City & M HKA Antwerp, Belgium (C)

A Nude Man’s City
Museum of Modern Art Sao Paulo, Brazil

Move: Art and Dance since the 60s
Hayward Gallery, London, UK touring to Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany. K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf, Germany

One Thing Leads to Another, Everything is Connected; Artworks from Stanmore to Stratford
Art On The Underground, London

2009

Art for Art’s Sake 09 -
Disharmonic Harmony Museo della Musica, Bologna, Italy

Le Sang d’un Poet
Saint-Nazaire Biennale Nantes, France

2008

Manifesta 7
Trentino, South Tyrol, Italy (C)

2007

PERFORMA07
New York (C)

Wolfgang von Kempelen
Man-[in the]-Maschine ZKM Medienmuseum, Karlsruhe

Earth?
Galerie Giti Nourbakhsch, Berlin

2006

ACTION ed.
fracpaca, Marseille

If it didn’t exist you’d have to invent it: a partial Showroom history
The Showroom, London

Poor Man’s Expression
(reading and film projection as part of the group exhibition)
Kino Arsenal, Berlin

Protections
Kunsthaus Graz, Austria (C)

Tate Triennial
Tate Britain, London (C)

Women of Europe
City of St Tropez

Uncertain States of America
Touring Exhibition
Bard Art Museum Bard College, New York, Reykjavik Art Museum, Hernig Art Museum, Denmark, Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, Serpentine Gallery, London, 2 Moscow Biennial for Conteporary Art, Moscow (2007) (C)

2005

The British Art Show 6
The Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead (C)

A Certain Tendency in Representation Thomas
Dane Gallery, London

Emblematic Display
Curated by Catherine Wood
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London

U-Move
Galeria Comunale d’Arte Contemporanea di Monfalcone, Italy (C)

Beck’s Futures
Touring Exhibition:
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, and others (C)

2004

In the Palace at 4 a.m.
Curated by Catherine Wood Alison Jacques Gallery, London

100 Artists See God
Curated by John Baldessari and Meg Cranston
Touring Exhibition: Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, and others (C)

Feast of Silenus
Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh

2003

The Moderns
Museo Castello di Rivoli, Turin (C)

Paris is Burning
Entwistle Gallery, London

Bootleg
Spitalfields Market, London

The Fragile Underground
Curated by David Thorpe
Bart Wells Institute, London

2002

Al Respecto 7
Rafael Tous Foundation, Barcelona

2001

Tirana Biennale
National Gallery, Tirana (C)

Sharing Sunsets
Tucson Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson

Not at Home
Solitude Gallery, Stuttgart

2000

Sentimental Education
Curated by David Rimanelli
Deitch Projects, New York

And She Will Have Your Eyes
Analix Forever Gallery, Geneva

New School
Works on Paper, Los Angeles

M.F.A. Thesis Show
UCLA New Wight Art Gallery, Los Angeles

1999

Black Dragon Society
Black Dragon Society, Los Angeles

Performances

2013

The Unlearning
(in collaboration with Theresa Wong and Massimilano Mollona) Roulette, New York, U.S.A

2010

Lapped Translated Lines
(a collaboration with choreographer Rosemary Butcher) Lilian Baylis studio, London

2007

Harpstrings and Lava
Watermill Center, New York

2006

Regeneration
(a collaboration with Zeena Parkins) Tate Modern, Turbine Hall, London

Object Relations
Hayward Gallery & Art Basel Miami Beach

The Wedding will not take Place
Poor Man’s Expression, Kino Arsenal, Berlin

2004

Spring is the Future, Concert in the Egg
Curated by Emma Robertson and Jo Stella-Sawicka
The Ship, London

Teaching

2006 — Present

Associate Professor
The Ruskin School of Art, Oxford University, Oxford

April — December 2008

LUX Mentoring Scheme
London

January — April 2008

Guest Artist
Sculpture Department, California College of Arts, San Francisco

TALKS, SYMPOSIA & PANEL DISCUSSIONS

2014

Mirror-Touch: Empathy, Spectatorship and Synaesthesia
Tate Modern, London (symposium convenor).

Daria Martin in conversation with Genine Lentine and Heidi Rabben
CCA Wattis Institute of the Arts, San Francisco, USA.

2012

Boxes Lecture
Royal College of Art, MFA programme in sculpture, London

2011

Maya Deren: New Reflections, Symposium, Choreography, For A Camera
Daria Martin in conversation with Rosemary Butcher, part of Maya Deren: 50 Years On, BFI, London

Lecture and Screening, Renewing Deren’s Legacy: Daria Martin, part of Maya Deren: 50 Years On, BFI, London.

Lecture and Screening, Séance for Maya Deren, part of Maya Deren: 50 Years On, BFI, London

2010

UCI Graduate Studio Art Lecture Series: Yvonne Rainer and Daria Martin Perfect Lovers, University of California, Irvine

Daria Martin and Anna Halprin in conversation, Hammer Museum, Billy Wilder Theater, Los Angeles

2009

Daria Martin In Conversation with Anne Collard, Remaking Anna Halprin, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

Lecture and Screening, Mapping the Lost Highway: New Perspectives on David Lynch, Symposium, Tate Modern, London

2008

Lecture and Screening
CCA, California College of the Arts, San Francisco

MFA Seminar, Translations
(with Ammiel Alcalay and Paul La Farge), key lecture: Synasethesia and the Translations of the Senses, Bard College, New York

Lecture
Art and Perception, Movement and Stasis, (with Colin Blakemore), University of Bristol, UK

Lecture
Royal College of Art, MFA programme in photography

2007

Talk and screening
St John’s College, Oxford

Lecture
Slade School of Art, University of London

Lecture
Anthropology Department, Goldsmiths College, University of London

2006

Artist’s Talk
(with Peter Welz, moderated by Bill Arnig)
MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge

Daria Martin
(screening and lecture)
Secession, Vienna

Dance and Art in London
(screening and lecture)
Suzanne Dellal Center, Tel Aviv

Daria Martin
(lecture about the works affinities with Joseph Cornell and Emily Dickinson)
Arnolfini, Bristol

Daria Martin
(lecture and screening)
The Royal College of Art, London

Four Women
a talk on Anna Halprin, Carolee Schneemann, Zeena Parkins and Nina Fog, part of the symposium Feminist Legacies and Potentials in Contemporary Art Practice, sponsored by If I can’t dance I don’t want to be part of your revolution
De Appel, Amsterdam

British Art Talks: Music
(lecture and panel discussion with Mark Leckey and Ryan Gander)
Tate Britain, London

Screening and Lecture
Bonniers Konsthall, Stockholm

2005

Daria Martin
(screening and lecture)
Swiss Centre, Paris

The New Moderns: Second Annual Conference
The Showroom, London

2004

The New Female Voyeurism
(screening and panel discussion)
The Institute of Contemporary Arts, London

bfi and Tate: International Symposium: By Design: Film Fashion Art Architecture
(screening and talk)
Tate Modern, London

SELECTED SCREENINGS & BROADCASTS

2013

Steel Town‘ with Massimiliano Mollona on Vdrome online platform curated by Edoardo Bonaspetti, Jens Hoffmann, Andrea Lissoni and Filipa Ramos

Maureen Paley, London, UK.

2012

Screening, Anna Moderato – In Use
Hackney Picturehouse, London, UK.

2011

Daria Martin: Selected Films
The Western Front, Vancouver, Canada

2010

Forum Expanded
60th International Berlin Film Festival, Berlin

2009

HIT, Gottenberg

2008

11. Clair-obscur Film Festival 2008
Basel, Switzerland.

NOTHING is exciting. NOTHING is sexy…
Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna

Conversation with Colin Blakemore
The Material World, BBC Radio 4, 13 November 2008

The Young and Evil
Film and video selected by Andrea Geyer, William E. Jones, Daria Martin, Carlos Motta, Karol Radziszewski, Bruce Yonemoto and Akram Zaatari, tank.tv, July – September 2008, Tate Modern, 20 September 2008

2007

Museum of Modern Art, New York

Never Spill
CCA Glasgow

2006

Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon
59th Locarno International Film Festival

The Artists Cinema
Frieze Art Fair, London

Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon
Tate Modern, London

2005

Artists’ Cinema
Frieze Art Fair, London

Daria Martin: Screenings
Casco Projects, Utrecht

Flesh and Fantasy
(film night curated by Daria Martin)
Tate Britain, London

Ed Ruscha Film Night
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Describing Form
(screenings curated by Lucy Reynolds for LUX, touring exhibition)
The Henry Moore Institute, Tate Britain, London, and others

2002-2005

Revolver
(a series of short films by artists, curated by Carmen Zita, broadcast weekly on the European arts Channel)
Expo 24X7

SOLO PUBLICATIONS AND EDITING

Forthcoming

Thresholds: Mirror-Touch Synaesthesia and the Social Life of Art
Volume edited by Daria Martin.

2013

One of the Things That Makes Me Doubt
ACCA: Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2013.

2012

Sensorium Tests
MK Gallery, jrp ringier, 2012

2009

Minotaur Museum of Contemporary Art
Chicago, 2009

2006

Daria Martin
Kunsthalle Zürich and Kunstverein in Hamburg jrp ringier, 2006

BOOKS AND CATALOGUES

Forthcoming

Man in the Holocene
The MIT Press

2012

Valeria Napoleone’s Catalogue of Exquisite Recipes
text by Barry Schwabsky and Valeria Napoleone
Walther König, Köln, 2012

2011

Animism (Volume II)
Generali Foundation
Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Köln

Dancing Through Life
Centre Pompidou, Paris

2010

Animism (Volume I)
Extra City & M HKA, Antwerp

Everywhere and All at Once: An Anthology of Writings on Performa 07
Edited by RoseLee Goldberg
JRP Ringier, 2010

2009

The Bart Wells Institute book
Edited by Luke Gottelier and Francis Upritchard, 2009

The Body in Contemporary Art Sally O’Reilly
Thames & Hudson, 2009

2008

Formulas For Now
Formulated by Hans Ulrich Obrist,
Thames & Hudson, London, 2008, p110

2007 Fresh Moves: New Moving Images From The UK
Tank TV, 2007, p40-41

Ice Cream
text by Jens Hoffmann
Phaidon Press, p240–243

Fresh Moves: New Moving Images From the UK (DVD)
Tank Form, London

2006

A world of pleasures to win
Essay by Jan Verwoert Dreizenehnzwei,
Vienna, Austria

Daria Martin
Action ed, 2006

2005

The British Art Show 6
Hayward Art Gallery, London

Uncertain States of America
Astrup Fearnley
Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, p78-79

The Showroom Annual 2004-2005
The Showroom, London

U-Move
Galeria Comunale d’Arte Contemporanea di Monfalcone, Italy

Beck’s Futures
Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, p65-75

2004

100 Artists See God
Independent Curators International, New York, p100-101

Art Now and Then
Tate Britain, London, p56

2003

I Moderni/The Moderns
Castello di Rivoli, Turin, p135 – 140

2001

Tirana Biennale
National Gallery, Tirana, p275-275

MAGAZINES, PERIODICALS & WEB-PAGES

2014

Valdes, Carolina, Synesthesia and the Bauhaus,
Theatre O, 6 January 2014.

Vasey, George, Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities,
kaleidoscope-press.com, 29 January 2014.

Seaberg, Maureen, Tasting the Universe, Synesthesia from the inside out
psychologytoday.com, 24 January 2014

2013

Johnson, Ken, Art in Review: ‘Weird Sceince’ New York Times Online. 25 April 2013.

Martin, Daria, Three Embarrassing Things, PERSONA (edited by Melissa Gordon and Marina Vishmidt), October 2013

Martin, Daria, Petunia #5, May 2013 Banbury, Stephanie, Connecting dreams and consciousness, The Age, 30 May 2013, p.29.

2012

Scene and Herd
Kate Sutton
Artforum, 13 March 2012

The Independent: Calm Joy Amidst
Art Fair Claustrophobia
Ellie Bronson
artcritical.com, 8 March 2012

At the MK
Brian Dillon
London Review of Books,
9 February 2012

Daria Martin
Martin Herbert
Art Review, April 2012, pp.108-109

Minotauromachia en rose
Ada Masoero
Il Giornale Dell’Arte, January 2012

Animismus
Dominikus Müller
Frieze d/e, Spring 2012, p.125

Daria Martin
Eleanor Nairne
Frieze, April 2012, pp.142-143

Danser sa vie
Kathy Noble
Frieze, March 2012, p.145

Walking on Sunshine
Kate Sutton
artforum.com, 12 March 2012

Artist of the week 181: Daria Martin
Skye Sherwin
guardian.co.uk, 15 March 2012

2011

The Gleaners and I (2000)
Daria Martin
Frieze, September 2011, p.191

2010

Animism
Chris Clarke
Art Monthly, May 2010, pp34-35

Animism
Sam Steverlynck
Art Review, April 2010, p118

Rosemary Butcher
Judith Mackrell
guardian.co.uk, 3 October 2010

The return of the Showroom
Ossian Ward
Time Out, 24 September 2009, p47

Under The Skin
Catherine Wood
Kaleidoscope, Summer 2010, pp82-85

The Nude Man’s City
Roelstraete, Dieter
springerin, issue 3/10, 2010

2009

Daria Martin’s In The Palace
Carol Bove
Tate etc, Summer 2009, pp110-111

Daria Martin
Eva Fabbris
Kaleidoscope, March 2009, p63

Martin, Daria & Matmos, Meeting of Minds, Modern Painters, March 2009, p80

London Reviews Marathon: Daria Martin
Laura Mclean-Ferris
Art Review, January 2009, p82

The Approval Matrix
New York Magazine, 02 March 2009

From China, Iraq and Beyond,
but Is It Art?

Ken Johnson
The New York Times: Weekend Arts,
20 February 2009

The return of the Showroom
Ossian Ward
Time Out, 24 September 2009, p47

2008

Performa 07
Francesco Bonami
Domus, January 2008

Case Study:Harpstrings and Lava and Minotaur by Daria Martin
Frieze, November-December 2008,
p158-159

Keeping Pace with Art Itself:
The Three M Project at the New Museum
,
www.db-artmag.com, Issue 3, 2008, p7

Daria Martin
Jessica Lack
Guardian Guide, 1st November 2008, p36

Exhibitionist: What to see this week
Laura Mclean-Ferris
guardian.co.uk, 14 November 2008

Pioneers/Passengers
Julian Myers
Frieze, January 2008, p181

Focus London, Artists Dictionary:
Daria Martin

Flash Art, October 2008, p95

Reviews: Daria Martin
Sally O’Reilly
Time Out, 13-19 November 2008, p69

Daria Martin at Maureen Paley
Temposhark
kctv.co.uk, 24 November 2008

Daria Martin
Maria Walsh
Art Monthly, December 2008, p33 – 34

2007

Previews: Performa07
Philip Auslander
Artforum, September 2007, p158

Daria Martin: just wants to dance
Louisa Buck
Art Newspaper, 7 December 2007

Never Still
Kennedy, Alexander
The List, 16 February 2007, p89

2nd Moscow Biennale
Simon Rees
Frieze, May 2007, p154

Map Magazine
March 2007

2006

Tate Triennial
David Barrett
Art Monthly, May 2006

Track and Field
Kirsty Bell
Frieze, March 2006, p126-129

Show me all your hidden secrets
Craig Burnett
Art Review, May 2006, p114-117

Tate Triennial 2006
Laura Cumming
Observer, 05 March 2006

Haunted by concepts of the past
Richard Dorment
Telegraph, 07 March 2006

On the Ground: London
Melanie Gillian
Artforum, December 2006,
p256 – 258 & 350

Periodical tables – Tate Etc
Simon Grant
Frieze, June, July, August 2006,
p248 & 249

Art Review:
Uncertain States of America

Fisun Guner
Metro, 14 September 2006, p36

British Art (does it) Show?
Andrew Hunt and Neil Mulholland Frieze, Issue 96, January – February 2006, p132-137

Zeena Parkins & Daria Martin: Regeneration, London Tate Modern
Pablo Lafuente
Wire, May 2006, p81

Uncertain States of America
Dean Kenning
Art Monthly, No. 300, October 2006, p31 & 32

Feats (and follies) of technology
Cate McQuaid
Boston Globe, 18 June 2006

Spotlight, British Art Show 6
Neil Mulholland
Flash Art, Volume XXXIX, Nº246, January – February 2006, p100

Greek Myth and
the Ghosts of Bexhill-on-Sea

Olivia Plender
Tate Etc, Spring 2006

Periodical tables – Untitled
Olivia Plender
Frieze, June, July, August 2006, p249

Rebels without a cause
Adrian Searle
The Guardian, 09 December 2006,
p18 – 20

Barry Schwabsky on Daria Martin
Barry Schwabsky
Artforum, March 2006, p264-265

Fast Forwarding The Avant Garde:
Daria Martin

Silvia Sgualdini
Uovo Magazine, Issue 11, 2006,
p24 – 51

Daria Martin/Bernd Krauss
Tanja Widmann
Springerin, 18 February 2006, p67

Tate Triennial 2006
Eliza Williams
Flash Art, May 2006, p63 & 64

Don’t miss
Art Review, March 2006

On the Ground
Artforum, January 2006, p218

Tate Triennial
Art Review, May 2006, p128

Tate Triennial 2006
Tate Magazine, April 2006

The Artists’ Artists
Artforum, December 2006, p119

Top 100 Artists
Flash Art, October 2006, p68-69

2005

Anti-Sensation!
Artist’s ‘discreet and quiet’ work wins £26,000 Beck’s Futures Prize
Arifa Akbar
The Independent, 27 April, 2005

Meet the new faces of the UK Art Scene
Arifa Akbar
Independent, 06 June, 2005

Beck’s Futures
Hephzibah Anderson
Evening Standard, 21 March, 2005

Brighter Future
James Anderson
Loaded Fashion, 31 March, 2005

Daria Martin interviewed
Diana Baldon
tema celeste, March – April 2005,
p56 – 57

Now you see it…
Pryle Behrman
Galleries, 01 April 2005, p15

Daria Martin: The Showroom
(review)
David Bussel
Artforum, May 2005, p261

Critics Pick & New this week
Rachel Campbell-Johnson
The Times, The Knowledge, 12 March 2005, p33

Laugh, cry, or try to get it, but it’’ all acreative mess
Campbell-Johnston, Rachel
The Times, 18 March 2005

Beck’s Futures
JJ Charlesworth
Modern Painters, May 2005

Shock and surprise are significant
Emmanuel Cooper
Tribune, 15 April 2005

Celluloid Sensibilities
Polly Corrigan
Telegraph.com, 08 March 2004

Tales from a shanty town
Laura Cumming
Observer Review, 27 March 2005

A Tidy Show Indeed
Charles Darwent
Independent on Sunday,
20 March 2005, p25

Futures Imperfect
Serena Davies
Daily Telegraph, 05 March 2005, p20

future fantastic
Kim Dhillon
i-D, Nº55, June 2005, p36

A truly Cosmopolitan affair
Iain Gale
Scotland on Sunday, 02 October 2005

Calling the young at art
Flsun Guner
Metro, 21 March 2005

Opportunity knocks
Eddie Harrison
Metro Scotland, 24 May 2005

Playing to the Gallery
Nick Hacksworth
Evening Standard, 22 March 2005

Martin Herbert
Artforum, 22 March 2005

The other art prize:
it’s cabaret night for maverick minds

Mary Horlock
Financial Times, 31 March 2005

British Art Show 6
Sarah James
Art Monthly, November 2005

…Beck’s Futures shows what a mess the ICA is in…
Waldemar Januszczak
The Sunday Times Culture,
20 March 2005

Where the creative misfits in Beck’s?
Moira Jeffery
Glasgow Herald, 01 June 2005

Smell of success:
Scented art up for prize

Jinman, Richard
The Guardian, 16 March 2005

Visions of ‘emotional landscapes’ seduce Beck’s judges
Jonathan Jones
The Guardian, 27 April 2005, p11

Beck’s Futures
Alexander Kennedy
The List, 09 June 2005

Brewer’s Droop
Sarah Kent
Time Out, 30 March 2005

Debut: Daria Martin
Pablo Lafuente
Art Review, January 2005

Daria Martin: The Showroom
(review)
Lisa Le Feuvre
Art Monthly, March 2005, p27

Graveyard with a scent of art’s richest award
Luke Leitch
Evening Standard, 15 March 2005

Instant Culture
Tom Lubbock
The Independent Review, 15 March 2005

It’s not the winning, it’s the
making art

Jack Mottram
Sunday Herald, 29 May 2005

Smell of Success for Arts Prize Contender
Sherna Noah
Scotsman, 15 March 2005

Daria Martin: The Showroom
(review)
Sally O’Reilly
Modern Painters, April 2005,
p110 – 111

Daria Martin: The Showroom
(review)
Lisa Panting
frieze, April 2005, p117-118

Say it with flowers
Adrian Searle
The Guardian, 22 March 2005

Beck’s Futures 2005
Alberto Sanchez
Exit Express, March 2005

A nose for novelty
Sarah Shannon
Independent, 03 March 2005

Smell of success for Arts Prize Contender
Press Association, 15 March 2005

Eye Robot
Rob Tufnell
Tank, January 2005

Sleight of Hand, Artists’ work on show for Beck’s Prize
Jim Winslet
Financial Times, 16 March 2005

Art and film get spliced
Ian White
Art Review, October 2005, p61-62

Art Beat & Hit List
The List., 13 June 2005

Awards and Shortlists
Art Review, Febuary 2005

Beck’s Appeal
Design Week, 13 January 2005

Beck’s Futures 2005
artrepublic,com, 22 March 2005

Beck’s Futures
ID, May 2005

Beck’s Futures
Metro Life, 08 April 2005

Beck’s Futures 2005
Scotland on Sunday, 29 May 2005

Beck’s Futures
The Times, 09 April 2005

Brit Art: the Next Generation
The Independent, 1 December, 2005

Drinks News
Night Magazine, 01 April 2005

Exploring the concept of form
and space

Exmouth Journal, 05 May 2005

Future Greats
Art Review, December 2005

In the balance
Art Newspaper, February 2005

In Pictures: Beck’s Futures finalists
BBC News, 15 March 2005

Openinmg this week
Metro Life, 18 March 2005

Pick n Mix
Attitude, March 2005, p106

Pick of the month
Arena, 01 April 2005

Six Scent Success in Richest Arts Awards
PA News, 26 April 2005

£26,000 Prize for Artist who leaves critics ‘baffled’
PA News, 26 April 2005

When does a sound become art?
Art Review, Volume LVI, May 2005
p74-77

2004

Beck’s Futures shortlist abandons the sensational for ‘more serious’ artworks
Jonathan Brown
Independent.com, 17 December 2004

Critics’ Picks: Closeup Gallery
David Bussel
Artforum Online, November, 2004

Scot based filmmaker Shortlisted for the Beck’s Future art prize
Rhiannon Edward
The Scotsman, 18 December 2004

ICA Unveils art prize shortlist
Charlotte Higgins
Guardian.com, 17 December 2004

Daria Martin
Pablo Lafuente
Art Review, Volume LIV, December 2004 – January 2005, p102

Corridor Shorlisted for Art Prize
Valentine Low
Evening Standard, 17 December 2004

Dark Art of Urquart wins place on Becks prize shortlist
Miller, Phil
Glasgow Herald, 18 December 2004

London Picks: In the Palace at 4 am
Emily Pethick
Artforum Online, July, 2004

Palace Evolution
Time Out, 28 July-4 August 2004

On Daria Martin
Olivia Plender
Untitled, Spring 2004, p14-19

Moving the Goalposts
Sanjoy Roy
Contemporary, issue 66, October, 2004, P32 – 35 and cover

Becks Futures Shortlist Announced artforum.com, 17 December, 2004

Jabba slugs it out for £20,000
Metro, 17 December, 2004

Short List for Beck’s Futures 2005 Announced
artdaily.com, 20 December, 2004

Star Wars Inspires Art Shortlist
bbc.co.uk, 17 December, 2004

2003

Quienes son los modernos?
Roberta Bosco
Babelia, 03 May, 2003

Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea
e-flux, 04 October 2003

The Moderns
Carolyn Chrietov-Bakargiev
TK_eventi, 16 April, 2003

Tris Espositivo al Castello di Rivoli
Jacaopo Cordero
culturalweb, 14 March, 2003

I Moderni al Castello
Guido Curto
Torino Sette Settimanale di spettacolo, cultura e tempo libero, 11 April, 2003

News: London
Richard Dyer
Contemporary, Nº55, 2003, p14-16

Labirinti Elettrici
Luisa Espanet
Gulliver, 3 March 2003

Moderni si, modaioli no: chi sono gli artisti della generazione post Twin Towers
Franco Fanelli
Il Giornale Dell’ Arte, No. 220,
03 April 2003, p12

Revelling in Beauty at Rivoli
Roberta Kedzierski
Hello Milano, May, 2003

La mostra “I moderni al castello
di Rivoli

Simona Maggiorelli
Europa, 05 April, 2003

I Moderni/The Moderns
Skira Milano
cerca cultura, 07 April, 2003

Un salto oltre il modernismo
Sabrina Passarella
Luna Nuova, 15 April, 2003

Il villaggio dell’arte e aperto
Andar Per Mostre
La Stampa, 26 April, 2003

Daria Martin and the Modern Pentathlon
Barbara Polla
Citizen K, Paris, Winter, 2003-2004, p68, 362

I Moderni
A. Giovanni Rangoni
Piu…, March 2003

La modernita emergente a Rivoli
Roberto Roselli
Mil Ano Arte, 16 April, 2003

I moderni in mostra
Valentina Rovera
Torino Magazine, No. 58, May, 2003

Guida al Maniero del futuro
Gabi Scardim
Il Sole 24 Ore, 27 April 2003

Per Dimenticare la noia del
Post-Modern

Vittorio Sgarbi
Grazia, 20 May 2003

Daria Martin
(review)
Andrea Viliani
Flash Art International, Milan, October, 2003, p124

Appuntamenti
Torino Always on the Move, May, 2003

Contemporanei? No, Moderni
La Repubblica, Rome, April 5, 2003, p65

Due Mostre
Ansa, 15 April, 2003

I Moderne/The Moderns
Lettera Dei Musei, 13 April, 2003

‘I Moderni’ in mostra al Castello di Rivoli fra musica e arte
Zero Nove, 14 April, 2003

Il Castello torinese dei Moderni
il Manifesto, 12 April, 2003

In Mostra
Grazia, 04 March, 2004

I Modernio/The Moderns
Go Spark, April, 2003

I Moderni/The Moderns
extrart, 11 February 2003

L’Arte & Il Sapere
La Gazzetta Web, 19 February, 2003

Lightbox 2
Art Now Tate, 2003

Castello di Rivoli
tema celeste, March 2003

Moderni
Arata Isozaki, Janet Cardiff, Giorgia Fiorio, Alessandre Testi
Torino Sette, 23 March, 2003

Rivoli
ExhibArt, 15 May, 2003

“The Moderns” e “Electric Labyrinth” al Castello di Rivoli
Portfolio Italia, 10 April, 2003

The Moderns I Moderni
Torino, March, 2003

2002

Maurizio Cattelan, curator,
Charley 01, New York, Spring, 2002

A room of their own
Pablo Lafuente
Artreview, London, November 2002

Birds
Esther Pierini
frieze, London, April 2002, p103

2001

First Take: Daria Martin
David Rimanelli
Artforum, New York, January 2001, p127

2000

Sentimental Education
(review)
Holland Cotter
The New York Times, New York,
July 14, 2000

Top Ten of 2000
Rimanelli, David
Artforum, New York,
December 2000, p120

Realm of the Senses
Saltz, Jerry
The Village Voice, New York,
July 6, 2000

From: Sophie

8 March 2008

Hi, Daria,

I experience pain and sensation in response to seeing or thinking about another individual getting hit or touched on part of their body. I get it in the same place on the opposite side if I am facing them, or on the same side if we are facing the same direction, and also get a shooting sensation up and down the middle of my torso when it happens.

It used to happen a lot more vividly when I was a child, and when I was 7, my mother took me to the doctor, who said my experiences were not uncommon and that they were called ‘Sympathetic Symptoms’. He taught me how to manage the pains by filling my head with other thoughts as quickly as possible when I saw someone else getting hurt, which happened a lot because little girls have a habit of playing with skipping ropes and chasing each other and nearly every day someone would fall or sprain their ankle. A cognitive distraction could manage the pain, to the point where, if I looked away and thought of other things quickly enough, I could almost prevent myself from experiencing it at all. It did, however, make me feel like an awfully unsympathetic person whenever one of my friends fell over!

Wishing you all the best,

Sophie

From: Daria

9 March 2008

Hello, Sophie,

Thank you for your intriguing account of your mirror-touch-synaesthesia.

I am curious about this form of synaesthesia specifically because it seems to differ from other forms in one important way: unlike ‘coloured hearing’, say, (in which the synaesthete experiences colours in their mind’s eye that others don’t perceive), mirror-touch synaesthesia is concerned with what others do experience. Rather than being inward-turning, does mirror-touch enable social connection?

But your story implies a movement in the opposite direction: despite being highly empathic, funnily enough, you described feeling more callous than others when you had to look away from your hurt friends. Do you think that mirror-touch (that might have evolved to increase protectiveness towards others) could, because of its extremity and your need to protect yourself from vicarious pain, ironically cut down

on your ability to act caringly?

As an artist (though not a synaesthete), I am attracted to synaesthesia as a complicated model to open up approaches to learning, perceiving, and communicating – approaches which might be latent but suppressed by our culture. What could the experiences of mirror-touch synaesthetes contribute socially or artistically to a matrix attuned to other thresholds of sensitivity?

How does your mirror-touch syn affect you on a daily basis?

Best,

Daria

From: Cara

10 March 2008

For Daria, Sophie and All:

My mirror-touch isn’t exactly feeling what other people experience, but instead I can feel things if they’re pointing at me. For example, a pen sitting on my desk pointing in my direction results in a very uncomfortable sensation of a pressure point. If a fork on the dinner table is pointed at me, I can feel the tines leaving a row of sharp pressure on my body where the fork is pointing. The intensity of the pressure varies depending on the object – book corners are dull sensations, while pens and fingers are sharper and ‘deeper’. However, it seems that I have to see the object, even just out of the corner of my eye, to ‘feel’ it.

Also, if something is moving across my line of vision, I can ‘feel’ its pull. It’s as if I have a kind of ‘magnetic field’ around my body, and an object moving across my line of sight ‘disturbs’ the field, creating a pulling sensation. The feeling corresponds to the part of my body that the moving object is level with.

Another sensation I’m beginning to wonder if it may be mirror-touch is that sometimes, when looking at an object, especially if it’s spindly or sharp, I can feel it in my mouth. It’s really unpleasant, especially since I ‘feel’ insects and spiders on my tongue!

All the best,

Cara

From: Amelia

12 March 2008

My son, Akim, has mirror-touch synaesthesia. He says what

he feels is dependent on previous experiences. If it is something he has experienced before, then he will feel nearly the same thing. If he has not had that particular experience, then he will feel a milder form of a related experience. This goes for pain as well as other sensory perceptions.

Some examples of how this works: (1) If he watches someone’s throat being slit on TV or in the movies, he feels the kind of cut he’s gotten from penknives; (2) If he sees someone being stabbed in the stomach, he feels it like a punch to the stomach. He’s never been stabbed, but he has been punched; (3) When he was younger, he didn’t feel much when he saw a man being kicked in the groin on TV or in the movies, although he never understood why people found it funny. He was kicked in the groin once when he was 12, and now he finds it very painful when he sees it on screen; (4) When he sees kissing on screen or in real life, he feels like he’s kissing. He didn’t feel this until after his first experience. Before that time, he felt a light touch on the cheek – which was the usual kissing he got as a child. When he sees couples kissing in the hallway at school, it annoys him because he doesn’t like feeling like he’s kissing on the way to class; (5) Once, when holding a cat of ours that was just coming out of anaesthesia after surgery, his hands felt numb and continued to feel numb for at least five or ten minutes afterward. He’s had anaesthesia and knows what it feels like. He was surprised I couldn’t feel it.

He can feel the sensation either as victim or attacker –

but it depends on the genre. He doesn’t like horror shows.

He feels what the victim feels. But, when he watches

action movies and karate movies, he feels like he’s the

one hitting, kicking, shooting. He relates this to the fun he had as a child pretending to be a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle or a Power Ranger, and happy sessions with his dad learning karate techniques, or the hours of fun playing with toy guns or swords – all of which almost never ended

up with painful contact.

One last thing: when he touches someone, he can feel their emotions, like most people feel hot and cold. He just senses it; it doesn’t become his own emotion.

From: Daria

13 March 2008

To Amelia

Akim’s synaesthesia sounds like it is part-gift and part-burden for him. The sensations you describe him experiencing are strong ones (whether pleasant or painful). Does he experience mirror-touch synaesthesia also for mild kinds of touch, like a soft caress or the touch of a distinctive fabric? For extreme temperature experiences? Or for taste, smell, for proprioceptive sensations (i.e., does he feel a sensation in his belly when he watches someone somersault)?

I wonder, Syn List, whether people with other kinds of synaesthesia experience excess empathy as Akim does?

Daria

From: Rachel

14 March 2008

Knowledge of empathy in the human condition is hardly

a recent trend.

Empathy as part of moral development is as old as religion and included in Kohlberg’s stages of moral reasoning. What people in the media and corporations are beginning to realise is that it’s not enough to be intelligent. It’s also important to be able to deal with other people successfully and collaboratively. Myers-Briggs tests notwithstanding, a brilliant boss with terrible empathy is a terrible boss.

Having good social skills doesn’t necessarily mean empathy.

Psychopaths are usually ‘charming’, which refers to flattery and social graces. These are rules that can be followed; drop compliments, open doors, make pleasantries and you’re charming. Empathy is the ability to internalise what someone else is feeling as if you were feeling it. Psychopaths most definitely have no regard for the feelings of other people.

People suppress personal or other people’s pain all the time: soldiers, snipers, or even just pedestrians walking past the homeless and suffering. There is surely a spectrum of pain experience and empathy as part of that, just as there is an unsurprising spectrum of every other part of human development.

From: Anne

15 March 2008

Hi Sophie, Daria, Amelia and everyone

I think that too much empathy can be just as much of a problem as too little.

On a personal note, I find it very difficult to detach from both the physical and emotional pain of others, even though there are clearly times when it would be ideal to do so. For example, I have always had big problems with seeing kids with loose teeth wobbling them around (it is like I can strongly feel the remembered pain of my own experience, although I would not call it anything like mirror-touch synaesthesia in my own case).

Where it becomes problematic is with the kids. My daughter stepped on glass and made it back from the park (about 300 yards away) with a shoe full of blood sloshing around and a deep gash on her foot. She put the shoe back on and managed to hobble home (it had fallen off at just the wrong moment and she put her foot down on the glass). Not every adult is good in a situation like this, but I had extra problems detaching enough to see the wound and clean it, in a situation where (for a lot of practical and evolutionary biological reasons) it would have been a lot better for my daughter if I could have detached, cleaned the cut and sorted it out with a minimum of emotion and physical malaise at the sight of the blood. This is one reason I was never

a candidate for medical school. Only some people can detach enough to dissect cadavers.

Similarly, my daughter’s teachers came up to us and said that she is the only one in the class who visibly trembles and shakes and starts to cry when another child is being strongly disciplined. They have said that, even though she is not the one being disciplined, ‘it is like she feels the thing personally’. She is the only one in the class who has to keep being sent to the girls’ bathroom to wash her face and try to compose herself after such events.

Best wishes

Anne

From: Fumiko

15 March 2008

Dear Daria

I do not have mirror-touch syn, but emotion-colour and music-colour syn. I found it interesting you asked whether empathy was increased with all synaesthetes. I never really associated my empathy with my syn, but it is definitely higher than almost anybody I have known. I cannot watch certain movies, and have a very low tolerance to watching people inflict pain and suffering on others intentionally. I cannot comprehend it, literally. It has nothing to do with squeamishness; I have worked in the medical field for almost 25 years, with almost 20 in level-one traumas, and do just fine. I cry right alongside my pregnant patients when they learn they have miscarried, and at times when watching TV, it’s almost like

I do experience mirror-emotion. I got agitated when I saw a clip of the Virginia Tech shooter video released to the public. I couldn’t watch more than a short couple of minutes. It wasn’t like I felt hate. I felt his hate, and a certain pain at the world. It’s always been this way.

Personally, I would love to associate this with my syn, because my boyfriend believes I’m a complete ‘sissy-la-la’.

Fumiko

From: Shaun

15 March 2008

My most significant types of synaesthesia are emotion-colour and physical sensation-colour. I am possibly oversensitive to how people feel to me, but I have always thought that this was tied to having grown up in an abusive household and church … my safety and my ability to keep my little sisters safe was tied to knowing who was dangerous or when people were likely to hurt me or my siblings.

I have had experiences of physically sensing what I perceived others were physically sensing (for instance, when watching the Chinese acrobats earlier this week, I got dizzy and queasy in response to the act where they roll around and spin inside the big rings). I also have had what I think

of as physical memories (there was a week or two I couldn’t open one of my hands when I remembered how it got burned when I was a child). I never thought of either of these as having anything to do with synaesthesia. Couldn’t it be that we all, and not just synaesthetes, carry physical memories that can be evoked on a cellular level just as memories are evoked on a cognitive, linguistic, visual or aural level?

I know of some other women who were abused as children who also experience what I call physical memory and find it difficult to watch violence because it evokes such strong empathetic experiences.

Shaun

From: Olivia

15 March 2008

All, and anyone discussing mirror-touch synaesthesia

I don’t have a very strong sense of mirror-touch, and I’m not sure I would like it too terribly much! However, I have noticed ONE sensation I get, in response to media, when

a character is somehow knocked unconscious. It could be drowning, head-blow, drugging, suffocation – it doesn’t really matter, just the fact that the character becomes,

by outside forces, unconscious.

It does NOT occur when someone just passes out (say, a mother fainting because she just got the news her son died). Until reading this discussion, I was under the distinct impression everyone experienced this, but I get a very physical sinking feeling everywhere between my ribs and hips. Pretty much just the abdominal area; nothing else. If the sensation is evoked for a long period of time, it moves to the legs to where they cannot support a standing position.

Is that the same thing?

Olivia

From: Alex

16 March 2008

Concerning feeling what others are feeling I would like

to suggest that at least some of this is probably a more universal phenomenon. Here is why.

In the U.S. a while back, there was a television commercial campaign against smoking. In it, a child is sitting in the back seat of a car. The mother is smoking a cigarette, and the cigarette smoke permeates the car. The camera shows the child being buckled into the seat. The camera shows the windows being rolled up. The camera shows the doors being locked. The camera shows the cigarette smoke.

The effect is one of suffocation.

If it were only synaesthetes who felt this, they probably never would have made the commercial.

Thank you

Alex

From: Daria

18 March 2008

 

 

Hello Syn List members

 

Regarding non-synaesthetes also experiencing ‘sympathetic symptoms’, a possible connection: some scientists have recently speculated that mirror-touch synaesthesia is an explicitly felt (as opposed to implicit, or unconscious)

form of ‘mirroring’ that we all experience (with the exception, perhaps, of a few – people with extreme autism, psychopaths, and others with very low empathy). Some

suggest that mirror-touch synaesthesia is a new term for old-fashioned ‘squeamishness’.

As you probably know, there has been much recent research into what scientists have identified as ‘mirror neurons’, and one theory about mirror-touch synaesthesia is that these synaesthetes’ mirror systems are on overdrive. Jamie Ward, a pioneer in this research, says: ‘We often flinch when we see someone knock their arm, and this may be a weaker version of what these synaesthetes experience.’

As Alex writes, many people cringe or look away while watching onscreen violence (I have always been very sensitive in this respect). Do films also appeal to and impact on our senses of touch, temperature, taste and smell, in part, through mirror neurons?

Daria

 

From: Gudrun

19 March 2008

In response, Daria, to your musing about the visceral effects of media, I think that at times it can have the opposite effect.

Some years ago when I was studying behaviour disorders and aggression, I remember reading a piece of research in which an audience was assembled ostensibly to hear a lecture. The auditorium had televisions mounted high at both sides of

the stage. Researchers watched the audience from a hidden location above the stage. During the lecture, a man came up on the stage and engaged in an altercation with the speaker. When the man began to physically assault the speaker, the majority of the audience shifted from watching the lecturer to watching the altercation on the television sets, even

as it unfolded in front of them. They did not intervene to defend the lecturer. The whole thing was staged, of course, to test the theory that people are comfortable watching violence on TV – that is, they are able to distance themselves from violence.

Gudrun

From: Lili

19 March 2008

I believe ‘empathy’ is a number of different attitudes, experiences or skills. I see danger in assuming that (for example) a person with mirror-touch synaesthesia cannot

be a con man, or assuming that a crime suspect is more likely to be the serial killer if he is autistic. I also think conforming to gender roles has some influence on the behaviours that are thought to involve empathy.

 

I have a male family member who has, for as long as I have known, shown great distress when watching scenes of real bodily harm and surgical scenes in movies and TV. This same person has a history of neglecting to notice when people around him are seriously ill or injured, requiring medical attention. I suspect that he’s pretty hopeless at reading the emotions of others. Noticing that someone has a great bleeding gash in their flesh does not require any type

of skill at reading emotions, social situations or facial expressions, but noticing that someone is in severe pain from a closed-injury broken bone requires rudimentary social or medical skills.

I do not know whether he has mirror-touch synaesthesia. I do not have it, but I do have many other forms of synaesthesia. I do not enjoy watching footage of real bodily injury in news broadcasts or surgical scenes, but movies don’t bother me as I know it is all fakery. Does knowledge of genuineness or fakery affect mirror-touch synaesthesia?

Lili

From: Laura

21 March 2008

 

 

Hi, all

I’m new to the list. I’m 25 years old and am pretty close to being totally blind, due to an inherited condition. For most of my life, I thought I could see only light, and only when the contrast is high. But recently, I’ve discovered that I seem to have some kind of visual tactile synaesthesia that helps me make sense of the tiny bit of visual information I’m getting. Here are a couple of my experiences.

I was looking at a computer screen that was set to high contrast, and I was able to describe some shapes that were on the screen. My mind supplied me with a picture that

felt like the raised line drawings I had seen in my maths textbooks. This is a common element of my experience: I’ll see something, and then instantly feel like my fingertips are exploring a picture of whatever it is I’m seeing. It seems as though colours and different kinds of light have different textures. Some light feels plasticky, others feel heavy, others feel thin, or thick, or metallic. I tend to feel these colour textures on my cheek. Also, sometimes moving different parts of my body helps me to understand what I’m seeing.

Another time, I was at a movie theatre and, when I looked at the movie screen, a picture popped into my head of a bathtub draining, or something melting. My mom told me that this is probably when the images on the screen are changing. At another time, I looked at the screen and saw something that felt like a wide open field, or an echoey building, and my mom said that’s when I’m seeing a landscape with not a lot else happening on the screen.

 

Thanks

Laura

All of Daria Martin’s films are made collaboratively, but several projects were initiated by or in conjunction with others. These include an interdisciplinary scientific project on synaesthesia, a social experiment with an anthropologist, an installation with a choreographer, and an ‘expanded cinema’ performance with a composer. Links to other collaborators can also be found below.

Selected Collaborations

Mirror-Touch Project
AI Lab, University of Zurich
Anna Halprin
A Practice for Everyday Life
Hamish Morrow
Jamie Ward’s synaesthesia lab
Laura U. Marks
Maja Ratkje
Massimiliano Mollona
Matmos
Michael Banissy’s lab
Modern Pentathlon Association of Great Britain
Post-Works
Rosemary Butcher
Shannon Jackson
Simon Stephens
Theatre O
Theresa Wong
The Magic Castle
Theatre of the Oppressed
UK Synaesthesia Association
Zeena Parkins

Mirror-Touch Project

Mirror-Touch: Empathy, Spectatorship and Synaesthesia is a research project led in conjunction with leading neuroscientists, and film and art theorists, and in consultation with synaesthetes. Supported by a Leverhulme Trust International Network grant and an Arts and Humanities Research Council Mid Career Fellowship, the project investigates mirror-touch synaesthesia, a recently discovered, deeply resonant neurological condition, and its implications for art and the spectatorship of art. People with mirror-touch respond to touch that is seen out in the world- applied to other bodies or even to objects- by feeling a corresponding touch on their own bodies. Uniting project’s investigations is the central question of how we look at and relate to cultural objects- artworks, films- and how mirror-touch offers provocative new perspectives on the relationship between the social and the visual.

Working in a long tradition of artistic questions inspired by synaesthesia (the crossing of the senses), the activities of this project draw upon first-hand accounts by mirror-touch synaesthetes, the neuroscientific foundations of the condition, and contemporary art practice and theory, in order to examine questions about cultural encounters. What does mirror-touch tell us about embodied responses to art objects, films and performance? In what ways might mirror-touch inspire debates about the ethics of cultural participation? And can mirror-touch become the basis of a new politics of art perception?

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Steel Town

With Massimiliano Mollona
Volta Redonda, Brazil
2012

Volta Redonda is a Brazilian steel town surrounded by a tropical forest. The city’s economy, and consequently its citizens’ lives, revolve around the Companha Siderurgica Nacional (CSN), the biggest steel mill in Latin America.  Steel Town, a longform HD video, will focus on working-class life in Volta Redonda, building a critical dialogue between art, popular television and politics.

The idea for the film arose out of Martin’s conversations with anthropologist Massimiliano (‘Mao’) Mollona, a specialist in labour issues and visual anthropology who conducted eight months of fieldwork in Volta Redonda. Together with Mollona, Martin instigated a theatre workshop (facilitated by a director from the Center of Theater of the Oppressed, Rio) with a dozen members of the local community, aimed at transforming personal stories into the widely recognised melodramatic form of the ‘telenovela’.

Martin filmed the process of the workshop, as well as the resulting ten minute long soap opera script on location around Volta Redonda. Martin also filmed ‘candid’ scenes within the city’s working class, gentrified, and commercial neighborhoods. Martin’s and Mollona’s plan is to interweave this material in an edit that complicates boundaries between ‘documentary’ and ‘melodramatic’ registers. They seek to ask questions about the nature of the ‘political image'; what happens when it is skewed and arguably enlarged by fantasy and fiction?

Cast / Workshop Participants

Helder Barros E Solza
José Antônio Guindane de Soosa
Lucas Miguel de Paiva Lacerda
Lucas Fagundes Cabral de Oliveira
Luan Gabriel da Silva Araujo
Marcelo Henrique S de Oliveira
Marina Coni Tavares
Paula Monteiro e Costa
Rebeca Monteiro E Costa
Ronaldo Joäo Gori

Crew

Producers
Jader Furtado da Costa
Ayrton Ferreira da Costa Junior

Directors
Daria Martin
Massimiliano Mollona

Telenovela Script Workshop Participants
Teatro Oprimido ‘Joker’ Flavio Santos da Conceicao

Camera
Daria Martin

Additional Theatre Leadership
Lucas Fagundes Cabral de Oliveira

Production Manager
Rebeca Monteiro E Costa

Additional Camera
Edgar dos Santos de Moraes

Sound Recordist
Jeansley Dos Santos Alves

Thanks to
Fundacao Cultural CSN

Lapped, Translated Lines

With Rosemary Butcher and Post-Works
Lilian Baylis Studio
Sadlers Wells Theatre, London
1-3 October, 2010

Choreographer Rosemary Butcher got her start experimenting at the Judson Church, New York City crucible of post-modern dance, and in the three decades since has created performances that transform everyday movements into intense, arresting forms.  Butcher approached Martin to make a film of her recent piece, Lapped, Translated Lines, which was born of discussions with dancer Elena Giannotti about Darwin’s writings on animal morphology.  Suggestive of a beast vigilantly traversing its territory, and secondarily of Butchers’ restless memories of her New York history, the dance called for a similarly doubled physical and ephemeral manifestation. Butcher wanted to project Martin’s commissioned film alongside the live performance, creating a hybrid that would span physical action and psychological presence.

Martin, curious whether she could carve into the space of the tightly compact, almost caged, choreography, chose to emphasise the camera’s mediation:  masked by a gridded structure, or tied to the dancer’s body, swimming through the air at the end of a stick, or functioning like a magnifying glass, the camera reveals viewpoints that an audience member, sitting on a set of bleachers, would not otherwise access.

In order to balance the film’s presence with that of the live performer, Butcher pared down Giannotti’s onstage movements to the point where they slowed or sometimes even stopped to take on the form of a seated figure who watched the film along with the audience.  The installation was completed by Post-Works’ snaking metallic form, evoking a landscape or a piece of frozen dance notation, and by Cathy Lane’s soundscape, composed, in part, of Butcher’s recordings made in New York.

Installation

Choreographer
Rosemary Butcher

Curator
Emma Gladstone

Performer
Elena Giannotti

Film
Daria Martin

Sets
Post-Works
(Matthew Butcher and Melissa Appleton)

Sound
Cathy Lane

Project management
Andrew Hammond

Technical Manager
Karsten Tinapp

Film production

Production Manager
Michael Smythe

Director of Photography
Suzie Lavelle

Editor
Guy Ducker

Gaffer
Freddy Bonfanti

Grip
Guy Bennett

Camera Assistant
Pete Lowden

Drive Operator
Joe Martin

Production Assistant
Peria Buckland

Photo by Tim Brotherton

Regeneration

With Zeena Parkins
Tate Modern Turbine Hall
2 April, 2006

Zeena Parkins is a composer, an improviser and a well-known pioneer of the electric harp, an instrument with which she has created her own artistic language. Commissioned for the Tate Triennial’s Live Works programme in 2006, Regeneration revolved around Parkins’ performance of a new, hour-long musical piece, framed by Martin’s triangular structure of scrims and photographic slides. The two have worked together before and since on a number of films.

Visual and sonic landscapes converged and diverged throughout Regeneration, creating a sense of ‘synaesthetic’ crossovers between the collaborators’ contributions. Echoing the physicality of Parkins’ amplified yet intimate playing (slipping wires, scrubbing metal brushes, crunching plastic), Martin’s 35mm slide images were painted, scratched, rubbed or otherwise distressed in miniature scale, then writ large in their projected form. Mirroring the slippery, processed and live sounds of Parkins’ music, the ephemeral slide images, captured across semi-transparent scrims, coalesced in unpredictable ways, changing and layering as viewers moved around the sculptural structure.

The installation could be seen as a form of ‘expanded cinema’ or ‘proto cinema’, widening Martin’s earliest experiments in the medium. Nods towards the piece’s mannered performativity could be glimpsed in Parkins’ glittering dress and in some of the slide show’s imagery, which dipped into theatrical and filmic genres such Butoh facial ‘masking’ and horror movie hunts. Regeneration ultimately acted as a kind of ‘sensing machine’, even a microcosmic city, in which organic, artificial and electronic life intertwined.

Cast of Slide Show

Nina Fog
Lorena Randi
Sam Weale
Emily Bright
Dylan Elmore
Fred Gehrig
Henrietta Hale
Rachel Lopez de la Nieta
Jonathan Stephens
Lindsey Weedon
Charlie Unwin
Katy Wood

Production

Production Manager
Steve Wald

Curators, Tate Modern
Stuart Comer and Catherine Wood

Costumes
Hamish Morrow

Set building
Scenery Jessel

Slides Operation
Ioanna Karavela and Anna Vass

Production assistance
Vanessa Descleaux

Thanks to
Lisa Rose
Thierry Bal
Xiao Yen Wang
Simon Jessel
Anne Hilde Neset
Lina Dzuverovic

Photo by Sheila Burnett

The Unlearning

With Theresa Wong and Massimiliano Mollona
Roulette
New York City
19 December, 2013

The Unlearning is a live performance of twenty one ‘miniature’ songs for violin, cello and voice, composed by Theresa Wong and performed by Wong and Carla Khilstedt. Accompanied by a visual projection component created by Martin in consultation with anthropologist Massimiliano Mollona, The Unlearning transforms source material pertaining to a philisophical, aesthetic and anthropological inquiry into war and violence. In particular, Maria Gimbutas’ visual anthropology on matriarchal societies is layered in ironic complement to Goya’s ‘Disasters of War’ etchings, images that inspired each of Wong’s songs.
This manifestation of The Unlearning arose from discussions between Wong , Mollona and Martin after their three-way collaboration on a film exploring personal and insititutional violence in a Brazilian city, Steel Town.

composer, vocalist, cellist
Theresa Wong

violinist, vocalist
Carla Kihlstedt

costume design
Theresa Wong

projected images
Daria Martin and Massimiliano

projection editing assistance
Edward Thomasson

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Thresholds: Mirror-Touch Synaesthesia and the Social Life of Art

Forthcoming / edited volume

volume edited by Daria Martin.

The neurological condition synaesthesia (the mixing of the senses) has for over a century provoked thought about new ways of artistic seeing. In the edited volume Thresholds: Mirror-touch Synaesthesia and the Social Life of Art, a recently discovered manifestation provides a lens through which to re-examine contemporary art experience.  People with mirror-touch synaesthesia feel a physical sense of touch on their own bodies when they witness touch to other people and often to objects. The condition is a rare yet recognizable form of heightened physical empathy: present in just 1 in 75 people, it is associated with an overactivation of the near-universal mirror (neuron) system.  Thresholds places mirror-touch, a social synaesthesia, at the forefront of dialogue between neuroscience, the humanities, and contemporary art theory and practice in order to explore, for the first time, its powerful potential as a model for the embodied and relational spectatorship of art. In these essays, the blurred thresholds in mirror-touch between sight and touch, and between self and other, are redrawn for an interdisciplinary readership as newly sensitized boundaries between image and action, art and life.

Thresholds brings together newly commissioned essays by leading neuroscientists, anthropologists, artists, art theorists, curators, and film and cultural theorists. Contributors include Simon Baron-Cohen, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Trisha Donnelly, Vittorio Gallese, Siri Hustvedt, Shannon Jackson, Wayne Koestenbaum, Mark Leckey, Laura U. Marks, Brian Massumi, Rabih Mroué, Christopher Pinney, Carolee Schneemann, Sha Xin Wei, Catherine Wood, and others.

colour and b/w images;
approximately 330 pages.

One of the Things That Makes Me Doubt

600DariaMartinCAT

2013 / artistic monograph

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne
ISBN: 9780987173294
Juliana Engberg and Daria Martin, eds.

In the exhibition, One of the Things that Makes Me Doubt, created especially for and with ACCA, Martin presented a survey of films together with her grandmother’s diary notes, drawings and paintings. Significant works including Birds (2001), Wintergarden(2005-11), and Harpstrings and Lava (2007) are presented in stages, all leading to the final encompassing film: One of the Things that Makes Me Doubt.

This catalogue of the exhibition includes a specially commissioned essay by Jennifer Higgie, a constructed dialogue between the dream diaries of Susi Martin and Hélène Cixous, and a conversation between Daria Martin and Etel Adnan. Foreword by Juliana Engberg.

paperback;
full colour publication;
63 pages;
design: A Practice for Everyday Life

Sensorium Tests

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2012 / artistic monograph

Milton Keyes Gallery, Milton Keynes
JRP Ringier, Zurich
ISBN: 9783037642726
Anthony Spira, Daria Martin, eds.

This publication centre on a 16mm film, Sensorium Tests, which emerged from Martin’s research into mirror-touch synaesthesia. People with this condition experience a physical sense of touch to their own bodies when they see other people, and sometimes even objects, being touched. Produced on the occasion of Martin’s survey exhibition at MK Gallery, this publication questions how sensations might be shared between objects and people.

With essays by Melissa Gronlund, Daria Martin and Anthony Spira. An anthology edited by Daria Martin includes texts by Mary Shelley, Wayne Koestenbaum, Laura Mulvey, Edgar Morin, Laura U. Marks, Thomas Elsaesser, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Yvonne Rainer, Emile Zola, Walter Benjamin, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Suely Rolnik, Guy Brett, Vladimir Nabakov, Vivian Sobchack, Sergei Eisenstein, and more.

softcover, 205 x 280 mm;
images 78 color / 36 b/w;
152 pages;
design: A Practice for Everyday Life

 

Minotaur

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2009 / artistic monograph

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
Dominic Molon, ed.
ISBN: 9780933856882

The catalogue documents an exhibition of a newly commissioned 16mm film, Minotaur, that travelled from MCA Chicago, to the New Museum New York, to Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Includes an essay by curator Dominic Molon and an interview between Daria Martin and choreographer Anna Halprin, as well as a collection of images gathered by Martin that reflect historical and personal associations to the Minotaur myth and Halprin’s remaking of it.

paperback;
some col. ill.
87 pages;

Daria Martin

artbook_2271_659640704

2006 / artistic monograph

Kunsthalle Zürich and Kunstverein in Hamburg
JRP Ringier, Zurich
Beatrix Ruf and Yilmaz Dziewior, eds.
ISBN: 3905701545

This catalogue documents solo exhibitions in 2005 at both Kunsthalle Zurich and Kunstverein in Hamburg, comprising five 16mm films: In the Palace (2000), Birds (2001), Closeup Gallery (2003), Soft Materials (2004) and Loneliness and the Modern Pentathlon (2004-2005).

The catalogue contains an essay by Catherine Wood and an interview with the artist by Beatrix Ruf and Yilmaz Dziewior.

Text in English and German.

hardback
color illustrations
96 pages